Facial Fractures from Recreational Activities Among the Elderly

Aging


Senior man in sports clothing in gym exercising with wheel roller for abs on floor as part of fitness training.

Facial trauma related to recreational activities in the older population is not well-studied. A group of researchers led by Andrea Plawecki studied the profile of recreational activity-related facial fractures among the elderly.

Exercise and other recreational activities are often recommended to patients, especially the older population, to prevent different diseases. However, facial trauma and other morbidities related to recreational activities among elderly patients have not been well-studied.

In an article published in JAMA Plastic Surgery, a group of researchers led by Andrea Plawecki conducted a study to determine the incidence of facial fractures secondary to recreational activities among older adults. A total of 20519 emergency department visits gathered from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System between January 1, 2011, to December 1, 2015, were included in the study. Data on emergency visits of adults aged 55 and older due to recreational activity-related facial fractures were included. The characteristics of the injury such as demographics, fracture location, and specific activities which caused the fracture were assessed.

Results of the study show that among 20,519 emergency visits, the annual incidence of facial fractures increased by 45.3% from 2011 to 2015. Bicycling is reported as the most common cause of facial fractures (26.6%), followed by team sports (15.4%), outdoor activities (10.1%), gardening (9.5%), and walking/jogging (5.5%). More men suffered from fractures due to bicycling while more women sustained fractures due to gardening-related activities. The most common site of facial fractures was in the nasal area; however, the incidence of orbital fractures tends to increase with age.

Overall, the study provided valuable information regarding the different characteristics of recreational activity-related facial fractures among the older population. The results of the study may help clinicians offer advice as to which recreational activities are beneficial in this age groups as well as provide information to prevent sustained facial fractures and other morbidities associated with different recreational activities.

Written by Karla Sevilla

Resource:

Plawecki, A., et al. (2017). Recreational activity and facial trauma among older adults. JAMA Facial Plast Surg. doi: 10.1001/jamafacial.2017.0332



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